Issue #17: Communication

Writers Award XVII: Communication – winners

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by New Philosopher on December 22, 2017

Silence. Emojis. Learning Latin. Letter writing. Arguments. Social Media. Dance your PhD. Deafness. Communication failure. The art of conversation. There was no shortage of interesting topics covered by writers for Award XVII ‘Communication’, who were selected from a record number of New Philosopher readers around the world. The shortlist for this quarter’s award includes three former winners: Angela Smith (Award XIII ‘Travel’ & Award XIX ‘Property’), Warren Ward (Award X ‘Fame’), and Phil Voysey (Award XII ‘Education’).

The winner of the Communication award, shortlisted on numerous occasions in previous awards, is Tim Campbell, for his entry Left to our own devices, which analyses the effect of communications technology on creativity, contemplation, and solitude. Tim receives the $1,000 first prize. The runner-up is Australian poet, writer, and two-time former winner Angela Smith for Language lessons, which looks at how learning languages can help us share universal human experience across cultures and centuries.

Thank you to everyone who took the time to enter this quarter’s award – the quality of entries was extraordinary. Whether you made this quarter’s shortlist or not, we trust that putting together an essay on this topic helped you clarify your thoughts. We hope to see entries from you for future Awards. The next Award is on ‘Stuff’ – you can find more information here.

Shortlist for Award XVII ‘Communication’:

  • Tim Campbell, finalist on multiple occasions
  • Christina Easton, philosopher and former finalist
  • Paul Gordon Jacobs, philosopher and writer
  • Jane Johnston, associate professor of communications
  • Colby R. Prout, philosopher and writer
  • Angela Smith, poet, writer, and former winner (twice)
  • Joe Tulasiewicz, research executive
  • Phil Voysey, education consultant and former winner
  • Warren Ward, psychiatrist and former winner
  • Ann Webster-Wright, academic and writer

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